Sberbank identifies culprit for recent data leak

Maria Nikolova

Sberbank’s Security Service has identified the employee who had tried to steal client data for personal gain.

Shortly after Sberbank Rossii PAO (MCX:SBER) confirmed that there had been a data leak affecting a number of credit cards of its clients, the Russian bank has announced that, with assistance from law enforcement agencies of Russia, Sberbank’s Security Service completed an internal investigation into the incident.

The bank said it identified the employee who had tried to steal client data for personal gain. The culprit, born in 1991, headed one of the bank’s division and had access to databases as a part of his job.

The vital clues providing evidence of the committed crime have been collected and documented. The employee has confessed and the police are now taking procedural actions. There is no threat of further data leakage now besides the 200 credit cards that were reported as compromised in a statement by the bank on October 3, 2019. As for the clients’ funds, the bank notes they were not affected.

Herman Gref, CEO, Chairman of the Executive Board of Sberbank, commented:

“On behalf of the entire Sberbank team and myself let me once again apologize profusely to the 200 customers for the incident and to all our clients for any inconvenience this caused. We’ve learned a lot from what happened and we rethought our systems to mitigate the effects of human reliability. I’d like to thank all our customers for the great trust they place in us. Let me also thank our Security Service, our BI.ZONE subsidiary, and all law enforcement agencies for the outstanding work that empowered us to solve this crime within hours.”

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